Beach Bunny

Beach Bunny

Some like to say that there’s a deeper meaning to songs. That the lyrics only tell half the story and the instruments do the rest. Beach Bunny herself says that’s not the case with her music. The lyrics she writes says everything she means. At least that what she says.

Listening to her play, there’s almost a sense of carelessness, like the breakup she’s writing about has no true effect on her. Her newest album, Crybaby, was written solely about a breakup she went through in February(plainly pointed out in the first song of the album). The lyrics themselves are sad and talk of a heart broken girl trying to be okay, but when she sang them on stage, she was barely upset at all. Several months having passed, it is understandable to be relieved of heartache, but without singing the emotion behind the breakup, the songs are a bit confusing.

Though it was the release party for her “Crybaby” album, she was in absolutely no mood to cry as she happily, and quite excitedly, sang her new songs. For example, in the song “Boys” she writes how all she does is “think of you and cry.” I was thankful there were no tears, but that also means her own lyrics don’t affect her emotion as she sings them. If she doesn’t put emotion behind each song how is the audience supposed to feel? The audience was pumped up, and rightfully so for a talented musician like her, but that only took away from the emotion the words should invoke.

Perhaps, she is going for the positive outlook on breakups that this album gives. Maybe the songs are supposed to give the satirical perspective they do. In speaking with her directly on the story behind the album she said, “I went through a breakup and I wrote about it. That’s pretty much it.” So there you have it, the songs are what she sings. There is nothing more behind it except for the possible positive outlook the upbeat tune insists on.

The album, itself, is a fantastic dedication to the real thoughts and feelings that go through her, and every girl’s, mind when she encounters heartache and she turns it into an upbeat catchy tune. The other music she has uploaded on her Spotify account goes from beach-time fun to wishing she could be in California. Her performance to “Greetings from California” was by far her most endearing. She has a lot of emotion tied to California and it comes out perfectly in her performance. The whole crowd sat on the floor and swayed to her rhythm, turning the small West Loop loft venue into a Chicago-style luau.

I highly recommend listening to her new album and see for yourself how Beach Bunny deals with “boys (being) boys.” Don’t forget to check out her other music too on Spotify!

Capital Soirée

Capital Soirée

With talent and young ages on their side, Capital Soirèe should have been the headliners for the concert at Subterranean in Wicker Park on April 26. They were second in line to showcase their talent, and by far the most appealing to any in the crowd. The audience may have come for the succeeding band, but the beauty in the sound of these young men made it an act that even Blink-182 would have a hard time following.

By the looks of these college students, you would’t pin them to be musicians, but they didn’t waste time on building up to a fantastic performance. Attending a concert, most would generally anticipate the show to build up progressively from a low level of talent to a high-sign-me-now-level of sound; that’s how it is planned most often. These boys, however, around the age of 20 years old and the youngest to perform this night, took control and made the stage theirs to conquer. And conquer they did.

A set complete with cover songs as well as songs of their own making, it was full and diverse throughout the night. They kept the audience alive and dancing to the rhythm throughout their set. The crowd grew to fill the room and had every member in the crowd, no matter how young or old, living together as one group, tied to each other with the music. They have come so close to perfecting the sound of a great performance at such young ages, it is hard to believe they haven’t been signed.

The members, themselves, are students at local Chicago colleges, one of which including Columbia College Chicago, the well-known Chicago school for the arts. It was here that they recently well-deservingly won the Battle of the Bands. Currently residing in Chicago, Fun House Entertainment plans on booking this young group for many shows to come, in high hopes of them making it big somewhere down the road.

Pine

Pine

Although the venue a little small and their set a little loud for the average listener, their sound prevailed. Pine made their Chicago debut on April 5, 2017, at Music Garage Chicago in the cozy little showcase room on the fifth floor. With a cpacity of about 40 and a total of 10–15 audience members at all times, the extra room to spread out was used effectively by Pine, themselves. Singer, Darlene, and her two guitarists put their equipment on the floor instead of the small stage. It only took about a foot or two of height away from them, but, as Darlene spent most of the time she sang lying on the floor, the height would have taken away from the intimacy oftheir performance. Darlene, herself was the center of attention, not only because she is the singer, but because she was the most into the music. As stated before, she spent most of the performance lying on the floor singing. She stared up at the ceiling as she sang and the passion in her music was made corporeal in the way she let her entire body give off how deeply her passion lies.

Recently signed to No Sleep Records, the story behind their discovery is one to live on through the ages as the true “millennial way.” They were driving back home through Canada as Darlene scrolled through twitter. She favorited a tweet by No Sleep Records and the page followed Pine. Before they knew it, they were signing a contract with their first record label and on their way to tour Canada and the United States to spread their name.

Emma Ruth Rundle

Emma Ruth Rundle

With a quiet voice and a timid demeanor, Emma Ruth Rundle opened the show with an instant sense of tranquil growth. She whispered into the microphone a short introduction including only her name and that the band would play a few songs. Her whispers drew my attention immediately to her face where I remained enraptured by the voice that had only moments before been nothing more than a child’s wishing upon a shooting star but soon grew in itself to be full and soothing. Her tones kept an air of tranquility throughout each song as her voice grew and shrank with each melody. The entire audience was held in silence between each song, speaking only to offer words of love and encouragement up to the stage. With each fan whose voice she heard, she whispered another “thank you” into the mic. 

Walking into a concert with the label of “psychedelic rock” I wasn’t too sure of what to expect, but I can for sure say that she blew my mind. Her voice is like none other in that it draws you in to look deep into her face and read the emotions she shares within her music. Her eyes themselves could have told the entire story of her songs in the way that she resembled Bjork’s undeniable entrapment. She had a way of pulling the listener into the music with her beautiful spell-like voice and held on to the entire audience even through the silences. 

For an up and coming artist, I can say now that the more people who hear her voice, the more she will be recognized as the next Loreena McKennitt and the prodigy of Bjork. Her performance brought me back to the days when my mom and I would ride in silence in the car, completely engulfed by the voice of Loreena singing “The Highwayman,” our favorite song. Lorena's perfect melody would keep us in a trance throughout the song, and Emma Ruth Rundle has surpassed those few minutes and extended the trance to cover her entire set.

Asia Monique

Asia Monique

Written by: Rachel Powers

Asia Monique, a woman with an amazing voice, began her musical career when she was a little girl. She sang in a church choir and school choir as a girl and moved on to be a vocal major in college at Saint Xavier University with a minor in journalism. By graduation she had switched to be a major in mass communications and a minor in vocal performance. She began singing background for local rap artists and eventually decided “how they do their music is completely left of how [she] wants to do [hers].” She describes her music as being a mixture of R&B, pop, and soul that adds up to being a genre called contemporary R&B. Within this genre is where she recorded her song “Heroine”. “Heroine” is a song she wrote and recorded in order to reflect love as a drug. She says, “It’s really focusing on the addiction and how addicted we are to it.” With the attention we crave from love and the feeling of needing it we are indeed addicted to love and its affects on us as people. “I’m high, I’m honest, I need it.” Love is like heroine in the way that, if taken too far, it can destroy us, and this message is portrayed beautifully the way her voice sings the lyrics it’s as if she is pulling the listener into a trance.

Asia Monique came in contact with Fun House Entertainment, who’s show she played on February 16, 2017, at a Chicago Music Networking event at the end of January where she played a song off her soundcloud and the owner of Fun House, Noah Schaik, instantly loved her voice. Based on her performance at HVAC Pub, it is obvious this is a woman who does not need vocal enhancers of any sort. Her voice is absolutely stunning and is, without question, easy to become entranced by.



A Talk with Co-Stanza

A Talk with Co-Stanza

Written by Rachel Powers

As a group that varies greatly in music tastes and interests, Co-stanza is a band that will go far in their endeavors. Jack Costanza, the rapper who lends his name to the band, acquired a love for music and performing sophomore year of high school when he and his friend started rapping as a joke until Jack began playing instruments such as the ukulele and the guitar. He was later joined by long-time lover of singing jazz and R&B, Katie Teston, who began her musical career at ten years old when she decided to be a professional actress and took voice lessons to further this ambition in musical theater; little did she know, music would become her true passion along the way. Ryan Adams, the third member of the trio, was the first of the group to find his passion in music. In fifth grade, he began playing various instruments after growing up with parents who had a love for music and exposed him to music at a very young age. When asked about their music, they describe what they play as starting off as a hip hop/rap act but now they have moved into doing anything that ranges from folk and singer/songwriter to pop and alternative with rap music permeating throughout the whole set. The influence for the genres and songs they play come from Jack mostly. The ideas for new songs begin in his mind and they put it to music together based on what sounds best. As individual artists, they have each made their own way and played shows on their own, but as a band, they have been booked by Fun House Entertainment for a couple shows already and, according to the owner of Fun House, there are many more to come. They have also booked their own shows at different venues and with other promoters and as Jack says, “It’s mostly just word of mouth and knowing people who own things.” They find the smaller shows they book on their own to be more intimate than larger, more official shows. Their newest EP Sketch was released in January of 2017 and consists of songs written and recorded mostly over the course of winter break. The idea for the album began when Jack wrote a song and Ryan mixed it. They liked how that sounded so they decided to make a project out of it. The three of them worked on it together and released it as soon as they finished. Though the three of them have deep passions for their music and plan on continuing to create music together, they each have their own ambitions outside of Co-stanza. Jack and Katie are currently students at Depaul University, neither of them majoring in music. Ryan is on his way to transferring to Berkley College of Music where he will continue his passion as an audio engineering major. Jack, Katie, and Ryan all like the sounds they create and plan on continuing to make music together in the future.


Foss

Foss

Just because you’re not from Chicago doesn’t mean you can’t roll with the Chicago hip-hop scene. This is proven true by Foss, a New York native who has made a name for himself here. After he graduated from Syracuse University, he moved to the Windy City and landed a job with iHeartMedia shortly after. Since then, he’s been doing nothing but big things. Inspired by rappers like Andre 3000 and Eminem, and with a sound like Kid Cudi and Childish Gambino, Foss has caught the attention of hip-hop fans everywhere. He has played shows all over, and just this year got to play the most memorable show of his life at SXSW.

While his fan base may be growing, Foss has clearly stayed grounded. Music, according to Foss, is what keeps him sane. When he’s not writing music, you can probably find him writing stories or expressing himself creatively through another outlet. His goal? To just keep telling stories through whatever medium he can.

You can see Foss this Wednesday, October 12th at Red Line Tap

Facebook: Foss